Now Playing Tracks

faustinerobert:

Tumblr, you’re gonna enjoy this. Hurray for the Riff Raff's Alynda Lee Segarra ( Puerto Rican heritaged, Bronx raised, New Orleans educated) is not only a magnificent musician but more importantly a class human. 'The Body Electric' is her answer to classic murder ballads like Johnny Cash’s ‘Delia’s Gone’.

"I just thought maybe it was time a woman sings a song about murder ballads since it’s so often women that are killed in murder ballads." (x)
"This one goes out to all the ladies out there who are tired of feeling afraid." (x)
 “I also feel like, first and foremost, I have this feminist lense that I see the world in. And I feel like folk music is so great because it’s a conversation throughout the generations. So I thought it was fairly important for someone like myself to add my voice into these old songs. And also just give these characters a voice, give Delia a voice. And just give these women characters their humanity back." (x)

(Hurray for the Riff Raff also self-identify as a queer band if you need any more encouragement to get on itunes already and support them).
faustinerobert:

Tumblr, you’re gonna enjoy this. Hurray for the Riff Raff's Alynda Lee Segarra ( Puerto Rican heritaged, Bronx raised, New Orleans educated) is not only a magnificent musician but more importantly a class human. 'The Body Electric' is her answer to classic murder ballads like Johnny Cash’s ‘Delia’s Gone’.

"I just thought maybe it was time a woman sings a song about murder ballads since it’s so often women that are killed in murder ballads." (x)
"This one goes out to all the ladies out there who are tired of feeling afraid." (x)
 “I also feel like, first and foremost, I have this feminist lense that I see the world in. And I feel like folk music is so great because it’s a conversation throughout the generations. So I thought it was fairly important for someone like myself to add my voice into these old songs. And also just give these characters a voice, give Delia a voice. And just give these women characters their humanity back." (x)

(Hurray for the Riff Raff also self-identify as a queer band if you need any more encouragement to get on itunes already and support them).
faustinerobert:

Tumblr, you’re gonna enjoy this. Hurray for the Riff Raff's Alynda Lee Segarra ( Puerto Rican heritaged, Bronx raised, New Orleans educated) is not only a magnificent musician but more importantly a class human. 'The Body Electric' is her answer to classic murder ballads like Johnny Cash’s ‘Delia’s Gone’.

"I just thought maybe it was time a woman sings a song about murder ballads since it’s so often women that are killed in murder ballads." (x)
"This one goes out to all the ladies out there who are tired of feeling afraid." (x)
 “I also feel like, first and foremost, I have this feminist lense that I see the world in. And I feel like folk music is so great because it’s a conversation throughout the generations. So I thought it was fairly important for someone like myself to add my voice into these old songs. And also just give these characters a voice, give Delia a voice. And just give these women characters their humanity back." (x)

(Hurray for the Riff Raff also self-identify as a queer band if you need any more encouragement to get on itunes already and support them).
faustinerobert:

Tumblr, you’re gonna enjoy this. Hurray for the Riff Raff's Alynda Lee Segarra ( Puerto Rican heritaged, Bronx raised, New Orleans educated) is not only a magnificent musician but more importantly a class human. 'The Body Electric' is her answer to classic murder ballads like Johnny Cash’s ‘Delia’s Gone’.

"I just thought maybe it was time a woman sings a song about murder ballads since it’s so often women that are killed in murder ballads." (x)
"This one goes out to all the ladies out there who are tired of feeling afraid." (x)
 “I also feel like, first and foremost, I have this feminist lense that I see the world in. And I feel like folk music is so great because it’s a conversation throughout the generations. So I thought it was fairly important for someone like myself to add my voice into these old songs. And also just give these characters a voice, give Delia a voice. And just give these women characters their humanity back." (x)

(Hurray for the Riff Raff also self-identify as a queer band if you need any more encouragement to get on itunes already and support them).
faustinerobert:

Tumblr, you’re gonna enjoy this. Hurray for the Riff Raff's Alynda Lee Segarra ( Puerto Rican heritaged, Bronx raised, New Orleans educated) is not only a magnificent musician but more importantly a class human. 'The Body Electric' is her answer to classic murder ballads like Johnny Cash’s ‘Delia’s Gone’.

"I just thought maybe it was time a woman sings a song about murder ballads since it’s so often women that are killed in murder ballads." (x)
"This one goes out to all the ladies out there who are tired of feeling afraid." (x)
 “I also feel like, first and foremost, I have this feminist lense that I see the world in. And I feel like folk music is so great because it’s a conversation throughout the generations. So I thought it was fairly important for someone like myself to add my voice into these old songs. And also just give these characters a voice, give Delia a voice. And just give these women characters their humanity back." (x)

(Hurray for the Riff Raff also self-identify as a queer band if you need any more encouragement to get on itunes already and support them).
faustinerobert:

Tumblr, you’re gonna enjoy this. Hurray for the Riff Raff's Alynda Lee Segarra ( Puerto Rican heritaged, Bronx raised, New Orleans educated) is not only a magnificent musician but more importantly a class human. 'The Body Electric' is her answer to classic murder ballads like Johnny Cash’s ‘Delia’s Gone’.

"I just thought maybe it was time a woman sings a song about murder ballads since it’s so often women that are killed in murder ballads." (x)
"This one goes out to all the ladies out there who are tired of feeling afraid." (x)
 “I also feel like, first and foremost, I have this feminist lense that I see the world in. And I feel like folk music is so great because it’s a conversation throughout the generations. So I thought it was fairly important for someone like myself to add my voice into these old songs. And also just give these characters a voice, give Delia a voice. And just give these women characters their humanity back." (x)

(Hurray for the Riff Raff also self-identify as a queer band if you need any more encouragement to get on itunes already and support them).

faustinerobert:

Tumblr, you’re gonna enjoy this. Hurray for the Riff Raff's Alynda Lee Segarra ( Puerto Rican heritaged, Bronx raised, New Orleans educated) is not only a magnificent musician but more importantly a class human. 'The Body Electric' is her answer to classic murder ballads like Johnny Cash’s Delia’s Gone.

"I just thought maybe it was time a woman sings a song about murder ballads since it’s so often women that are killed in murder ballads." (x)

"This one goes out to all the ladies out there who are tired of feeling afraid." (x)

“I also feel like, first and foremost, I have this feminist lense that I see the world in. And I feel like folk music is so great because it’s a conversation throughout the generations. So I thought it was fairly important for someone like myself to add my voice into these old songs. And also just give these characters a voice, give Delia a voice. And just give these women characters their humanity back." (x)

(Hurray for the Riff Raff also self-identify as a queer band if you need any more encouragement to get on itunes already and support them).

… the sissification fetish: the desire for men to be feminized and then degraded. The whole point of this kink is for men to be treated how women are, to be degraded how they are degraded in porn and in real life.

Obviously that hits home with me. I am a woman. I experience this daily.

So to have a man tell me he wants to be sissified, is difficult because as soon as we are done he gets to take off the costume. He gets to be a man again. His privilege is so prevalent that he can wear my gender to get him off and then be able to take it off whenever he wants. While I remain a woman.

As a Feminist it’s important for me to be constantly critiquing my kinks and the kink community. Which can be difficult because a lot of fetishes challenge my very staunch feelings on these issues. It’s also difficult because a lot of people in the kink community don’t want to critique the problems, because it causes them to have to think twice about themselves.

(Diary of a Femdom - x)

His privilege is so prevalent that he can wear my gender to get him off and then be able to take it off whenever he wants. While I remain a woman.

(via exgynocraticgrrl)

pasttensevancouver:

Marie Lloyd, 1914

Marie Lloyd was a top headliner on the English Music Hall scene for nearly four decades. The “Cockney comedienne” wore elaborate gowns and expensive jewels, but was thoroughly working class in her sympathies and outlook. Her stage career began the year Vancouver incorporated, and she shot to fame almost overnight, largely because her larger-than-life persona and the material she performed resonated with the working class, especially women. Off the stage, she supported a successful 1907 strike of lesser-known performers and theatre workers by manning picket lines, performing at fundraisers, and helping to bankroll the strike fund, even though her stardom meant the strikers’ grievances didn’t affect her personally.

The tour of the Sullivan and Considine vaudeville circuit that brought Marie Lloyd to Vancouver got off to a rough start. She found herself detained at Ellis Island in New York for twenty-four hours on a charge of “moral turpitude” because she had not yet married her travelling companion as she had claimed when coming into the US. Eventually she was released and allowed entry for the duration of the tour on a large bond and a promise that she and her fiancé (who had been charged under the “White Slave Traffic Act”) would stay in separate accommodation while on US soil. When a journalist asked what she thought of America so far, Lloyd pointed to the Statue of Liberty and said “I love your sense of humour!”

Marie Lloyd opened her Vancouver engagement on February 2, 1914 at the Orpheum Theatre. The mayor and other city officials and their wives were invited to opening night, which in hindsight wasn’t the best idea. The papers are light on the offending details, but Lloyd’s stage act was notorious for its risqué themes, suggestive language, and Lloyd’s masterful ability to imbue material with a naughty meaning using a well-placed wink or gesture. She always insisted that “blue” interpretations of her songs originated in the mind of the listener, but with lyrics such as “she’d never had her ticket punched before” in a song about a farmer’s daughter taking the train into town for the first time, her denials seem disingenuous. Indeed, Lloyd’s talent for subverting the lingering and stifling Victorian morality of the era largely explains her popularity.

Mayor Baxter and other officials in the audience were aghast at Lloyd’s opening night performance, which included “The Ankle Watch,” a song described as “the way a watch, plus a slashed skirt, would awaken a general masculine interest in the passing of time.” One official explained to the World newspaper that he was ashamed that he brought his wife to the show and was only consoled by the presence of other respectable officials. Charley Jones, the City License Inspector, was directed by the mayor to order Lloyd to drop two songs and to give a “less vivid rendering of others” to avoid having her show cancelled altogether.    

Former and future Vancouver mayor and publisher of the World, LD Taylor, was also in attendance on opening night. In an editorial the next day, Taylor wrote a scathing denouncement of Marie Lloyd and commended Mayor Baxter for taking decisive action. In response, Lloyd paid a visit to the World Tower and physically attacked Taylor. Police were called and forcibly removed her in front of a huge crowd that had gathered outside.

Lloyd begrudgingly complied with the City’s specific demands, but she didn’t do so quietly. From her platform on the Orpheum stage all that week, she let the full houses know just what she thought of the mayor and, he claimed, she had found new ways “be offensive to good taste.” In a pre-emptive move, Mayor Baxter had her final performance cancelled, alleging that she was planning to “give some repertoire that would make Vancouver ‘sit up and take notice.’” News of the cancellation didn’t reach the Orpheum until after the show had sold out and the seats were full. Lloyd unsuccessfully fought to go on anyway and bit one of the men restraining her.

To make matters worse, Lloyd and her paramour found that escaping Vancouver wouldn’t be so easy. Immigration officers at the border claimed that by leaving the US for the Canadian leg of her tour, she had violated the terms of the bond agreement she had made at Ellis Island. Lloyd’s protest at not being allowed into the US again reached all the way to Washington, DC, and she was eventually allowed to finish the tour, although she had to leave her fiancé behind.   

Source: Marie Lloyd postcard ca. 1900, National Portrait Gallery #NPG Ax160001

I wish there was a show…

fifithatchickoverthere:

corvuse:

fifithatchickoverthere:

where two people of the opposite gender are friends and there’s the usual tensions between them… but, it’s not sexual tension.

They are both serial killers trying to resist the urge to kill each other because they really need a friend. 

You just described at least half of the seasons of Dexter.

I totally forgot about Dexter. The series finale was sooo horrible, I just blocked all of it from my memory.

Funny, I’d blocked out how angry the finale made me.

underattack86:

lambdageneration:

chizuu:

alyx’s face while talking to mossman

same

The quality of Alyx’s facial animations really drives home that the key is technique and finesse, not technological brute force. The game came out a decade ago and it’s got better facial animation than all of the modern CoD games combined. They built a phoneme engine from the ground up, used it to generate rough lip animations for the game’s spoken dialogue and then hand-tweaked each animation until they were perfect. Then they built a whole expression/gesture engine from the ground up and individually choreographed each scene: not only could Alyx turn to look at the player and roll her eyes, she could do it while blending into any other animation. You can blend running with talking and head-shaking and pointing and limping, if that’s what you want to do. It’s really potent.
They studied human language. They studied the art of animation. I believe they even hired a linguist. The end result is so good it’s practically timeless. And I’m not ragging on CoD games, they look great, but the lip-sync and choreography is still not up to the high water mark of the decade-old trendsetter Half-Life 2.


I’m pretty sure they used Ken Perlin’s face demo tech (maybe just the idea behind it and not the actual code?) for their expression engine. You can play with the original here:http://mrl.nyu.edu/~perlin/experiments/facedemo/
underattack86:

lambdageneration:

chizuu:

alyx’s face while talking to mossman

same

The quality of Alyx’s facial animations really drives home that the key is technique and finesse, not technological brute force. The game came out a decade ago and it’s got better facial animation than all of the modern CoD games combined. They built a phoneme engine from the ground up, used it to generate rough lip animations for the game’s spoken dialogue and then hand-tweaked each animation until they were perfect. Then they built a whole expression/gesture engine from the ground up and individually choreographed each scene: not only could Alyx turn to look at the player and roll her eyes, she could do it while blending into any other animation. You can blend running with talking and head-shaking and pointing and limping, if that’s what you want to do. It’s really potent.
They studied human language. They studied the art of animation. I believe they even hired a linguist. The end result is so good it’s practically timeless. And I’m not ragging on CoD games, they look great, but the lip-sync and choreography is still not up to the high water mark of the decade-old trendsetter Half-Life 2.


I’m pretty sure they used Ken Perlin’s face demo tech (maybe just the idea behind it and not the actual code?) for their expression engine. You can play with the original here:http://mrl.nyu.edu/~perlin/experiments/facedemo/
underattack86:

lambdageneration:

chizuu:

alyx’s face while talking to mossman

same

The quality of Alyx’s facial animations really drives home that the key is technique and finesse, not technological brute force. The game came out a decade ago and it’s got better facial animation than all of the modern CoD games combined. They built a phoneme engine from the ground up, used it to generate rough lip animations for the game’s spoken dialogue and then hand-tweaked each animation until they were perfect. Then they built a whole expression/gesture engine from the ground up and individually choreographed each scene: not only could Alyx turn to look at the player and roll her eyes, she could do it while blending into any other animation. You can blend running with talking and head-shaking and pointing and limping, if that’s what you want to do. It’s really potent.
They studied human language. They studied the art of animation. I believe they even hired a linguist. The end result is so good it’s practically timeless. And I’m not ragging on CoD games, they look great, but the lip-sync and choreography is still not up to the high water mark of the decade-old trendsetter Half-Life 2.


I’m pretty sure they used Ken Perlin’s face demo tech (maybe just the idea behind it and not the actual code?) for their expression engine. You can play with the original here:http://mrl.nyu.edu/~perlin/experiments/facedemo/
underattack86:

lambdageneration:

chizuu:

alyx’s face while talking to mossman

same

The quality of Alyx’s facial animations really drives home that the key is technique and finesse, not technological brute force. The game came out a decade ago and it’s got better facial animation than all of the modern CoD games combined. They built a phoneme engine from the ground up, used it to generate rough lip animations for the game’s spoken dialogue and then hand-tweaked each animation until they were perfect. Then they built a whole expression/gesture engine from the ground up and individually choreographed each scene: not only could Alyx turn to look at the player and roll her eyes, she could do it while blending into any other animation. You can blend running with talking and head-shaking and pointing and limping, if that’s what you want to do. It’s really potent.
They studied human language. They studied the art of animation. I believe they even hired a linguist. The end result is so good it’s practically timeless. And I’m not ragging on CoD games, they look great, but the lip-sync and choreography is still not up to the high water mark of the decade-old trendsetter Half-Life 2.


I’m pretty sure they used Ken Perlin’s face demo tech (maybe just the idea behind it and not the actual code?) for their expression engine. You can play with the original here:http://mrl.nyu.edu/~perlin/experiments/facedemo/

underattack86:

lambdageneration:

chizuu:

alyx’s face while talking to mossman

same

The quality of Alyx’s facial animations really drives home that the key is technique and finesse, not technological brute force. The game came out a decade ago and it’s got better facial animation than all of the modern CoD games combined. They built a phoneme engine from the ground up, used it to generate rough lip animations for the game’s spoken dialogue and then hand-tweaked each animation until they were perfect. Then they built a whole expression/gesture engine from the ground up and individually choreographed each scene: not only could Alyx turn to look at the player and roll her eyes, she could do it while blending into any other animation. You can blend running with talking and head-shaking and pointing and limping, if that’s what you want to do. It’s really potent.

They studied human language. They studied the art of animation. I believe they even hired a linguist. The end result is so good it’s practically timeless. And I’m not ragging on CoD games, they look great, but the lip-sync and choreography is still not up to the high water mark of the decade-old trendsetter Half-Life 2.

I’m pretty sure they used Ken Perlin’s face demo tech (maybe just the idea behind it and not the actual code?) for their expression engine. You can play with the original here:

http://mrl.nyu.edu/~perlin/experiments/facedemo/

Who cries when black women die from street harassment?

feministsorgnow:

I really do need an answer. Because Mary Spears’s right to move about freely in the world was denied to her, her life taken from her, and there are no marches. No one has broken out the bullhorns or their comfortable sneakers. There are no widespread calls to protect the autonomy of black women and their bodies. The community leaders haven’t deemed this unacceptable and a fate no one should ever face simply because they reject a man’s advances.

We make Tumblr themes